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THE 3RD ANNUAL NEW SITCOM REVIEW

This year I’m giving a chance to six new sitcoms. It was supposed to be seven, but I forgot about Mulaney and decided not to care.

Unfortunately I’m not seeing a single one that will survive to season two and I expect most of these to be cancelled before the end of season one. I haven’t seen the ratings, so this is all purely my opinion at this point.

Selfie introduced me to Karen Gillan. She is spectacularly hot and I will watch this show to the bitter end just to see her. This show is actually entertaining, but will surely suffer from the same problems as Cougar Town: A decent show with a poorly chosen title.

Black-ish is yet another Hollywood product to feature an advertising executive. If you’ve ever read my blog, you will be well aware of my hatred for this. Prepare for every episode to play out like this: Real life lessons give big idea to big advertising pitch. I’ve watched the first two episodes and have let the rest pile up on my DVR. I haven’t yet given up, but I have a feeling this might be this season’s The Millers, which still to this very day have 15 episodes sitting on my DVR from last season.

I found Cristin Milioti to be much more likable in How I Met Your Mother after episode one of A to Z, but episode two was much better and it keeps improving. I think this one will have a good chance of surviving, and I hope it does. Nothing really new or groundbreaking here, except that it takes a cue from 500 Days of Summer and lets you know the relationship you are watching is doomed.

Bad Judge is just bad. Bad Teacher god cancelled last year and burned off over the summer, and that show was much better.

I’ve read a lot of negative things about the inner dialogue in Manhattan Love Story, and I sort of agree. I don’t think it’s as annoying as everyone is making it out to seem, but this show has every cliche in the book, and this is why it will fail. Analeigh Tipton is cute as a button and I will watch every minute of this show because of her hoping it improves, but knowing it will fail. I just read that this has been the first cancellation of the season and I’m sad. Such a shame. I’ve stuck by this one and it actually has improved. Yes, it’s still completely unoriginal and cliche, and yes, maybe I’m just in love with Ms. Tipton, but dammit…too soon!

Marry Me is good. Of all the new sitcoms, I think this has the best chance of surviving.

To wrap up this year’s sitcom reviews, I found four that I will be watching within 48 hours of taping, which is not bad. But I’m only finding one (Marry Me) that I’m confident will survive, and one (A to Z) that might survive. There’s nothing original or unique this season and nothing laugh-out-loud funny. I’ve discovered two women to fall in love with (Analeigh Tipton & Karen Gillan) that star in sitcoms that will cease to exist. I wonder when TV executives will learn that a bad title will sink a show (Selfie). I wonder when the next group of friends will hang out and get into funny situations sitcom will debut. I wonder why they feel like every new sitcom must have a tired and cliche gimmick.

TV Shows & Trust

This was my final post at my old blog (thehollywoodrant.blogspot.com) and it’s an issue I’ve always been passionate about. To me, there’s nothing worse than investing my time in a television show that gets cancelled without any closure. Having this happen to me way too many times, I’ve found my trust int networks to do right by me slowly dwindling to the point where I’m not willing to give any new show a chance until I’m sure it won’t be cancelled.

As I age I become more hesitant to watch anything new that comes on my television. Work, love, family; these are just a few real-life factors that force us all to have less time for TV as we get older.

But there’s another factor at play here: TRUST. Years and years of withering trust in the shows I watch to give an ending to building story-lines has made me very unwilling to give a new show a chance. Why should I waste my time on anything if they’re not going to finish the story?

I don’t stand alone here. There’s not a single person out there who hasn’t had this happen to them on multiple occasions. It usually happens in the form of struggling shows filming a huge, game-changing finale, complete with cliffhanger ending, all in the hopes of drawing enough interest to save said show. Then the show gets cancelled. This is infuriating, but usually some time passes, the weather heats up, trips to the beach are taken, and I’ve quickly forgotten about it.

Problem is, that’s all fine and dandy the first few times it happens, but sooner or later, trust in the television industry to do right by me and all of the people who invested their time falls apart completely.

For some reason, when a show is cancelled a few episodes in, it feels even worse. Maybe it’s because there’s no summer to wash away the hurt, I don’t know, but it feels worse nonetheless. Recently, a coworker invested her time in Zero Hour, and I begrudgingly invested my time in Do No Harm. Both of these shows were cancelled after only a couple of episodes. We can quickly and easily look back at the two, three hours we wasted and think of all the things we could’ve done instead, or all the other shows we could’ve put our time into instead. I still have four episodes of Shameless to catch up on. Damn, wish I would’ve done that instead.

I believe all of this is causing anger amongst the fans of television, and I’m pretty sure this is playing a role into lower-than-expected ratings for some of the network’s biggest debuts. The networks were expecting big things from the previously mentioned Zero Hour and Do No Harm as well as the earlier debuts of 666 Park Avenue and Last Resort. All of them failed. But even in failure, at least 10 to 20 million different people invested some of their time in at least one of these shows, and stuck with them past their first and second episodes. That adds up to a lot of pissed off people who want to know what happens next.

To solve this problem, I propose that television networks do the following: first, if a show has failed in a prime spot in your schedule, burn off the remaining episodes on Saturday instead of four to six months later in the summer. Second, if a show gets cancelled without a chance to wrap up story-lines, allow the show to film a two-hour TV movie to please the fans and give them some closure. There is no third. This is simply about building that trust back, and if these two steps are followed, the fans will again have trust that their time won’t be wasted because the stories they decide to invest in will be guaranteed to have an ending.